Eyecare Business

AUG 2016

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42 E y e c a r e B u s i n e s s . c o m August 2016 V I S I O N 1 0 1 which gives these foods their orange hue, is a carot- enoid that the body breaks down into vitamin A. Eaten in combination with sources of zinc, vitamin E, vitamin C, and the micronutrient copper, beta-carotene has been shown to slow the prog- ress of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In the U.S., most chickens are fed supplements of beta-carotene to give their flesh and their egg yolks a more golden hue, and though it's done for mostly aesthetic reasons, it does mean that eating eggs offers a sort of complete package: healthy fat and protein, plus zinc to help ferry vitamin A to the retina in order to produce melanin, pigment that protects the eyes from sun damage. è BLACK CURRANTS, CHERRIES, DARK BERRIES. Dark fruits are superfoods for so many reasons, but for eyes they're especially good. Anthocyanins, the flavonoids responsible for giving these fruits their deep purple, blue, and red colors, have been shown to protect the retina from oxida- tive stress, and they may also inhibit lens opacity and reduce diabetic cataracts. The vitamin C in to your own shopping basket. Your grandma would be proud. è LEAFY GREENS. Besides being high in fiber, folic acid, and iron, dark leafy greens—from today's ubiquitous spinach, lettuce, and kale to the more rare collards, mustard greens, or Swiss chard—are great for your eyes. They're high in antioxidants, specifically carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, both of which are stored in the macula and, like sunblock, serve to protect the retina from damaging light. Depending on where you live, greens like these are available locally year-round except for the coldest weeks in winter and the hottest ones of summer. Don't be afraid to try new-to-you power greens varieties like tatsoi, mizuna, dandelion, broccoli rabe, or turnip greens. è ORANGE VEGETABLES & EGG YOLKS. The bright orange hue of carrots, orange bell peppers, and sweet potatoes is a dead giveaway that you're looking at an eye-healthy vegetable. Beta-carotene, The bright orange hue of carrots, orange bell peppers, and sweet potatoes is a dead give- away that you're looking at an eye-healthy vegetable.

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